Book Review: Killer Of The Flower Moon

Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBIKillers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Killer Of The Flower Moon
The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI
By David Grann
Reviewed by Jay Gilbertson
“In the 1920’s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.”
Author, David Grann is a staff writer at The New Yorker and a bestselling author. In this well documented and thoroughly researched book, he sheds light on another dark chapter in American history.
In the early 1870’s, The Osage Indians were forced from their land in Kansas onto what was then considered a worthless rocky reservation in northeastern Oklahoma. But as the oil industry boomed, this ‘worthless’ land was just the rugged surface features atop one of the biggest oil reserves in the US. Oil prospectors paid the Osage royalties and in the early Twentieth Century, each member on the tribal roll started receiving checks. Big. Huge. Checks. They eventually got millions. This sudden wealth had equally sudden consequences.
America, fed by a racist and sensationalistic press, went bananas over stories of the Osage community’s sudden blast to the rich life. Their fame attracted the worst sort of corrupt white men with unscrupulous designs for attaining the ‘headrights’ or the heritable shares of oil royalties owed individual members of the Osage Nation
The Osage began to be killed, but the local authorities and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, for the most part, failed to uphold justice or the law. The growing backlog of unsolved murders was brought to the attention of Washington in 1925 by a local lawman, James M. Pyle, who sought assistance from the Bureau of Investigation. The wealth of some of the Osage victims attracted national press and became an ‘embarrassment’ for the newly formed FBI, so J. Edgar Hoover appointed a former Texas ranger with the unfortunate name of Thomas B. White to investigate. The Osage murders were in some ways the FBI’s first big case, and one that Hoover used to help make his mark on Washington and re-create the image of the FBI as a solid investigatory agency.
Author Grann weaves a compelling tale through years of research and the staggering amount of evidence that identified one man, William Hale, as a mastermind behind the slaughter of at least twenty of the Osage. As Grann’s reputation as a researcher became known throughout the Osage community, ancestors of victims sought him out to share their stories of family members disappearing and fortunes lost. He realized the murderous rein was not limited to the government’s original estimate of 24 Osage members, but was easily in the hundreds and involved multiple murderers. Hale was finally convicted of murder in 1929 and jailed for life, but was paroled in 1947. Nearly all of the other murders remain unsolved.
After decades of mismanagement of the oil rights of the Osage by the Department of the Interior; “In 2011, the US government settled with the Osage for $380 million. The settlement also strengthened management of the tribe’s trust assets and improved communications between the Department of Interior and the tribe.”
There is no easy way for our nation to make amends to the Osage survivors. No simple explanation to explain away the prejudice that led to so much murderous loss of not only human life, but the completely illegal confiscation of wealth that was rightfully theirs. This well written chronicle goes the distance to return the Osage to their due place in American history, but will we do ours and re-write the history books?

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Do YOU Know What A Sandbakkel Is?

At every meal my dad says the Norwegian Table Prayer. Then he always follows it by saying, “Grab a root and growl.” I have always simply assumed that is pretty much part of the prayer too. At least if you want to eat at his table, it is.

 

Traditions.

 

Another one that has been going on since I can remember is the creation of Sandbakkels every Christmas season. Using the same recipe (my mom has tweaked) my dad’s mom’s mom used and with my dad mentioning before we sit down at the card table to ‘pinch’ the dough into tins,

 

“No pinchy, no eaty!”

 

Really. Every. Single. Year.

 

Once the little gems are in the oven and we’re working on pan two or three, I wonder why in the world I do this. It’s a lot of work and you have to sit still and then, once my dad is all warmed up and we’re there, his audience, I realize the why part.

 

Being together.

 

So, this coming year I will once again gather at my folks, my mom will have made the dough, adding the secret ingredient at the last moment and then off we’ll pinch and my dad will begin sharing the same stories I’ve heard a hundred times and I’ll look up and smile…

 

By the way, a Sandbakkel is a Norwegian cookie and no, we don’t fill them with anything. These are the tins we pinch them into.

 

(walnut-size blob of dough and pinch and pinch and pinch)

Book Review: Sharp Objects

Sharp ObjectsSharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Sharp Objects
By Gillian Flynn
Reviewed by Jay Gilbertson
For Halloween I read a gripping mystery/thriller not for the squeamish. If you got a jolt of WOW from reading Gone Girl, you are in for an intense, enigma drenched shock-loaded, secret-packed page turner. This treacherous tale is driven by a pack of mean girls on steroids and the twists and turns will have you guessing all the way to the blood-pressure-through-the-roof ending. I mean, holy cow!
Phew. Now if that intro didn’t pull your reading curiosity to click over and reserve a copy of this baby, read on.
Meet Camille Preaker, a thirty-something woman with a face that could have launched her into magazine cover stardom. Instead she chose the life of a Chicago newspaper reporter with a focus on crime. Really gruesome crime. The kind that sells papers. The kind you read with the lights on. That kind.
Camille grew up in the small town of Wind Gap, Missouri and it is there she is sent by her hard-drinking chain-smoking editor boss to cover a murder. A little girl was strangled and now another is missing. This particular town is not only where Camille grew up, it’s where her younger sister Marian died. It’s also where her beyond belief rich mother still lives and it’s there that this story really rocks. And rolls.
Camille has an issue, a problem, a mental condition. I’ll let her tell you:
“I am a cutter, you see…My skin screams. It’s covered with words—cook, cupcake, kitty, curls—as if a knife-wielding first-grader learned to write on my flesh….Sometimes I can hear the words squabbling at each other across my body.”
I know. Totally bizarre right? But can you imagine a better protagonist unraveling a mystery where she grew up along with all those words carved across her body and all that history in that small troubled little town? And it gets far more intriguing too. Camille has a step-sister, Amma, who is only thirteen, but beyond beautiful and much more dangerous than any sweet little spoiled rich girl ought to be. And then there is the mother. Adora. You just can’t even imagine.
Author Flynn has a razor-sharp snap with every word she chose, her metaphors will blow you away and the dialog hits you square in the eye. Underneath the clever turn of words her journalistic background allows her to root out the motivations of the horrible things we do to one another and somehow give them justification. This is perhaps her greatest triumph as a writer. The ending, though a huge relief when it hits, left me a little slumped with disappointment in my chair. Then I learned this book is now a short series movie and I really am not sure I could re-live this crazy story. Then again, why not?

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Review: The Luckiest Girl Alive!

Luckiest Girl AliveLuckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Luckiest Girl Alive

By Jessica Knoll

Who needs a beach/porch read? You do. This fact-paced, snappy novel packs a really satisfying (though it will make you squirm) ending. For a long time, I had wondered, what in the world is an ‘unreliable narrator’ and who would use one? And what kind of an author would pen a novel with the lead actor cast as a nasty, jaded human. Author Jessica Knoll does both and boy is this a kicker.
Give this opening a read:
“I inspected the knife in my hand….my fiancé. That word didn’t bother me as much as the other one that came after it. Husband. That word laced the corset tighter, crushing organs, sending panic into my throat with the bright beat of a distress signal…Slip the forged nickel and stainless-steel blade soundlessly into his stomach.”
I know. And believe me, the tension level in the tale is tight as a drum. One thing that I will share with you is that at the very end of the book, Knoll reveals one really horrible part of her book is autobiographical and had I known that from the start, I would have given TifAni FaNelli a little wriggle room. She is the lead in this train-wreck and boy does she have an opinion. About everything.
Twenty-eight-year-old Ani (alias TifAni) is rocking what she desperately wants you to believe is the most incredible life EVER! Living in New York, working for a high-brow women’s magazine, wearing the best of the best designer this and that and her body, a size zero with dangerous curves. Ani is the epitome of young female perfection in accordance with the super-hyped world of high-fashion. In other words, this dynamite babe is one hot tamale. Only that way inside is a fourteen-year-old girl who never fit in. Never. But dang, she did her best to try. And they did their worst in the process.
Through flash-backs we are led down the rocky road of what created this desperate woman/girl to reach for something we are constantly and ferociously led to believe is the ultimate goal. Looks, body and the perfect man will make your life incredibly amazingly perfect. Right?
Except, it doesn’t.
There are not one, but two defining moments that spin TifAni’s life literally out of control. They are both shocking in their own right and together create an amazing backdrop to how someone can be motivated to do some pretty unbelievable things in order to create an illusion of not only fitting in, but making it.
The fascination of the structure as well as how in the world is this all going to end create a pulse that pulls you in and doesn’t let go. The snide and snarky internal dialog of Ani adds to this quirky character and ultimately her barely discernable tender insides allow you to nearly like her.
Nearly.
There are many life lessons Ani draws from and one that sticks with me is how, no matter the odds, the good guys just never completely win. But honestly, it’s not the winning that counts, it’s the journey and boy is this one a doo
• Great for book clubs

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Review: FACTFULLNESS

Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You ThinkFactfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You Think by Hans Rosling
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

FACTFULLNESS
Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World—and Why Things Are Better Than You Think
By Hans Rosling

This book will give you something we as a nation, no, wait a second, make that the world really needs right now.
Facts.
Things are not as bad as you may think they are especially when you have the facts. Want to test yourself about your basic knowledge of the world? Try these three questions, then check your answers at the bottom. No peeking.
1. In all low-income countries across the world today, how many girls finish primary school?
A: 20 percent
B: 40 percent
C: 60 percent
2. Where does the majority of the world population live?
A: Low-income countries
B: Middle-income countries
C: High-income countries
3. In the last 20 years, the proportion of the world population living in extreme poverty has…
A: Almost doubled
B: Remained more or less the same
C: Almost halved
Author Hans Rosling, a renowned Swedish doctor, researcher and lecturer in global health, created this book for all of us who have been getting the present state of the world totally wrong. It’s not your fault, entirely, but it is up to you to get your facts straight and realize that overall, we’re on the right track. Why does your blood pressure surge every time you tap through the news or talk to your co-worker? Author Rosling calls it the overdramatic worldview which is usually stressful as well as misleading. Why? The main reason the media does this so well is very simple; it keeps you watching, clicking, tweeting and wanting more of the same. It’s time for something new. Why have we gotten stuck in this mind-numbing treadmill? Rosling has a simple theory.
He believes we are intrinsically interested in gossip and dramatic stories. Admit it, we are. Our quick-thinking brains crave human drama in all its myriad of foibles, which he refers to as our dramatic instinct. This is what causes misconceptions that directly influence an overdramatic worldview. He feels we need to control our appetite for the dramatic because it prevents us from seeing the world as it is and leads us terribly astray.
One of the biggest influences our media uses to keep us clicking back for more is—fear.
“When we are afraid, we do not see clearly. Critical thinking is always difficult, but it’s almost impossible when we are scared. There’s no room for facts when our minds are occupied by fear.”
This simple fact is not only easy to discern by reading any news headline but is the single most powerful driving force constantly moving us further and further away from the facts. What other facts might you learn from Rosling that will alleviate your daily self-induced dose of unproductive chain-and-ball stress?
Consider these.
Facts (exact numbers see link) of bad things decreasing in the world: oil spills, children dying, deaths from disasters, hunger. Facts of good things increasing: women’s right to vote, science, girls in school, literacy, child cancer survival.
“…a fact-based worldview is more useful for navigating life…and probably more important: a fact-based worldview is more comfortable. It creates less stress and hopelessness than the dramatic worldview, simply because the dramatic one is so negative and terrifying. When we have a fact-based worldview, we can see that the world is not as bad as it seems—and we can see what we have to do to keep making it better.”
Rosling is no Pollyanna, however. In a recent essay in the Guardian, he addresses the obvious challenge to his reasoning… “My guess is you feel that me saying that the world is getting better is like me telling you that everything is fine, and that feels ridiculous. I agree. Everything is not fine. We should still be very concerned. As long as there are plane crashes, preventable child deaths, endangered species, climate change sceptics, male chauvinists, crazy dictators, toxic waste, journalists in prison, and girls not getting an education, we cannot relax. But it is just as ridiculous to look away from the progress that has been made. The consequent loss of hope can be devastating. When people wrongly believe that nothing is improving, they may lose confidence in measures that actually work.”
The world is not as bad or lost or scary or messed up or un-fixable as we tend to believe. Know the facts and focus on what is important.
You.

· Know the facts
· Want more? gapminder dot org
· Correct answers: 1: C, 2: B, 3 C

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