Review: FACTFULLNESS

Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You ThinkFactfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You Think by Hans Rosling
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

FACTFULLNESS
Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World—and Why Things Are Better Than You Think
By Hans Rosling

This book will give you something we as a nation, no, wait a second, make that the world really needs right now.
Facts.
Things are not as bad as you may think they are especially when you have the facts. Want to test yourself about your basic knowledge of the world? Try these three questions, then check your answers at the bottom. No peeking.
1. In all low-income countries across the world today, how many girls finish primary school?
A: 20 percent
B: 40 percent
C: 60 percent
2. Where does the majority of the world population live?
A: Low-income countries
B: Middle-income countries
C: High-income countries
3. In the last 20 years, the proportion of the world population living in extreme poverty has…
A: Almost doubled
B: Remained more or less the same
C: Almost halved
Author Hans Rosling, a renowned Swedish doctor, researcher and lecturer in global health, created this book for all of us who have been getting the present state of the world totally wrong. It’s not your fault, entirely, but it is up to you to get your facts straight and realize that overall, we’re on the right track. Why does your blood pressure surge every time you tap through the news or talk to your co-worker? Author Rosling calls it the overdramatic worldview which is usually stressful as well as misleading. Why? The main reason the media does this so well is very simple; it keeps you watching, clicking, tweeting and wanting more of the same. It’s time for something new. Why have we gotten stuck in this mind-numbing treadmill? Rosling has a simple theory.
He believes we are intrinsically interested in gossip and dramatic stories. Admit it, we are. Our quick-thinking brains crave human drama in all its myriad of foibles, which he refers to as our dramatic instinct. This is what causes misconceptions that directly influence an overdramatic worldview. He feels we need to control our appetite for the dramatic because it prevents us from seeing the world as it is and leads us terribly astray.
One of the biggest influences our media uses to keep us clicking back for more is—fear.
“When we are afraid, we do not see clearly. Critical thinking is always difficult, but it’s almost impossible when we are scared. There’s no room for facts when our minds are occupied by fear.”
This simple fact is not only easy to discern by reading any news headline but is the single most powerful driving force constantly moving us further and further away from the facts. What other facts might you learn from Rosling that will alleviate your daily self-induced dose of unproductive chain-and-ball stress?
Consider these.
Facts (exact numbers see link) of bad things decreasing in the world: oil spills, children dying, deaths from disasters, hunger. Facts of good things increasing: women’s right to vote, science, girls in school, literacy, child cancer survival.
“…a fact-based worldview is more useful for navigating life…and probably more important: a fact-based worldview is more comfortable. It creates less stress and hopelessness than the dramatic worldview, simply because the dramatic one is so negative and terrifying. When we have a fact-based worldview, we can see that the world is not as bad as it seems—and we can see what we have to do to keep making it better.”
Rosling is no Pollyanna, however. In a recent essay in the Guardian, he addresses the obvious challenge to his reasoning… “My guess is you feel that me saying that the world is getting better is like me telling you that everything is fine, and that feels ridiculous. I agree. Everything is not fine. We should still be very concerned. As long as there are plane crashes, preventable child deaths, endangered species, climate change sceptics, male chauvinists, crazy dictators, toxic waste, journalists in prison, and girls not getting an education, we cannot relax. But it is just as ridiculous to look away from the progress that has been made. The consequent loss of hope can be devastating. When people wrongly believe that nothing is improving, they may lose confidence in measures that actually work.”
The world is not as bad or lost or scary or messed up or un-fixable as we tend to believe. Know the facts and focus on what is important.
You.

· Know the facts
· Want more? gapminder dot org
· Correct answers: 1: C, 2: B, 3 C

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